California is in the middle of a debate about its new academic degree system, which has seen students and colleges scramble to get their degrees in as many as 150 subjects and is expected to cost an estimated $500 million a year.

In addition to being a big draw for students and parents, the new system has also become a major headache for the state’s education department.

In a statement to The Associated Press, the department said that the program, which started in 2020, is “not a simple system, and it is not clear if the state will be able to implement it.”

The new system, known as the Comprehensive Assessment for Admission to a College or University (CAAU), requires a two-year academic program and is aimed at improving the academic performance of the next generation of California’s students. “

The Department of Education is currently assessing how the program can be implemented and what resources the state should allocate to support students and families, and how best to help educate students on their rights under the new law.”

The new system, known as the Comprehensive Assessment for Admission to a College or University (CAAU), requires a two-year academic program and is aimed at improving the academic performance of the next generation of California’s students.

But it has also come under fire from students and advocates for the poor, including the California Association of Community Colleges and Universities, which says it is a system that unfairly favors students who have less than a bachelor’s degree and low test scores.

“There are a lot of things that are being done that are inequitable, that have been done by the Department of State and the California Legislature that are hurting the people who need help the most,” said Elizabeth Brown, president of the California Community Colleges Association.

“There’s a lot that’s being done on the education front that’s not being done at all.”CAAUs are federally funded programs designed to improve college and university performance and are designed to ensure that students receive a quality education.

Students can take the CAAU, or Advanced Placement, exam for a bachelor of science degree and then earn their bachelor’s or master’s degree in that field.

The program requires that a student’s degree be in-demand and is a prerequisite for a job.

It is a requirement that is not met in most states.

The California State Senate recently approved a bill that would make CAAUs more affordable and streamlined for schools.

That bill passed the state Assembly and is headed for the governor’s desk, which means that he can sign it into law.

Critics of the new CAAUS say it discriminates against students who are low-income and the undocumented.

A recent study by the California Coalition for Immigrant Justice found that of 1,100 students who completed the CIAU, 95 percent had less than high school diplomas, and 97 percent had low scores on standardized tests.

The proposed bill would also add a third tier of eligibility to the CACAU.

The bill would allow students to complete the program for an additional year.

It would not replace the current CAAUD, which is funded by state revenue.